Dec 152010
 



Unless your hiding under a bush you will have heard that the UK government are offering a £5,000 grant towards purchasing an electric car. They are promising to improve the number of charging stations scattered around the UK and are also promising low car tax and business tax for electric car users too.
Here is the list – with pictures of the nine electric cars that the Government are planning to offer a £5,000 grant towards purchasing.

Mitsubishi i-Miev: Expected in January 2011

Mitsubishi iMiev - Electric Car - £5,000 grant

Mitsubishi iMiev - Electric Car - £5,000 grant

Smart ForTwo: Expected in January 2011

Smart ForTwo - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Smart ForTwo - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Peugeot Ion: Expected January 2011

Peugeot Ion - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Peugeot Ion - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Nissan Leaf: Expected March 2011

Nissan Leaf - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Nissan Leaf - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Tata Vista: Expected March 2011

Tata Vista - Electric Car - £5,000 Uk Grant

Tata Vista - Electric Car - £5,000 Uk Grant

Citroen C-Zero: Expected Early 2011

Citroen C-Zero - Electric Car - £5,000 UK Grant

Citroen C-Zero - Electric Car - £5,000 UK Grant

Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid: Expected Early 2012
Toyota Prius Plug in Hybrid - Electric Car - £5K Grant

Toyota Prius Plug in Hybrid - Electric Car - £5K Grant

Chevrolet Volt:  Expected Early 2012
Chevrolet Volt - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Chevrolet Volt - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Vauxhall Ampera: Expected Early 2012
Vauxhall Ampera - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Vauxhall Ampera - Electric Car - £5,000 Grant

Although you get £5,000 off the price of one of these cars new the actual cost may be over £20,000 and the Government will only pay £5,000 up to 25% of the cost.  It is the battery that costs the most money not the car.  It is hoped that battery costs will come down in the future when production of electric vehicles is increased.  However in the meantime these cars will not be cheap.

You also have to consider where the UK gets its power from. Is it co2 friendly? Does the energy come from turbine, sun or another ecologically friendly method?


Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.